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973.7L63 
EL6388 



Lincoln Memorial, 
Hodgenville, Kentucky, 
the Birthplace of 
Lincoln. 



LINCOLN ROOM 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 




MEMORIAL 

the Class of 1901 

founded by 

HARLAN HOYT HORNER 

and 

HENRIETTA CALHOUN HORNER 



LINCOLN 



MEMORIAL 




\i. «.<»v«^»K 



HODGENVILLE, KENTUCKY 

"The (Birthplace of Lincoln " 



LINCOLN 



MEMORIAL 



HODGENVILLE, KENTUCKY 

"The birthplace of Lincoln ' 




Published by 

THE HERALD-NEWS 

Hodgznoille, Ky. 




MEMORIAL BUILDING 

ENCLOSING 

THE LINCOLN LOG CABIN 



'Lb 2 //a^ocaJ h^ 




The Log Cabin 



The cabin where Lincoln was born now sits where it stood at 
the time of his birth, February 12, 1809. 

It has been occupied by several families since Thomas Lin- 
coln left it to move nine miles north on what is now the Jackson 
Highway. A Mr. Home sold the Lincoln birthplace cabin to Royal 
P. Hankie, and he sold it to Richard Creal, who occupied the double 
log house at the entrance to the farm. This old fashioned double 
log house was built back in the dsys when the Lincoln ck.bin stands 
where it is now placed. 

After Lincoln's election to the presidency the cabin was moved 
about a mile and a half from its present site and variously occupied 
as a school house, for negro tenants and white occupants until 1894 
when it was moved back to its present site. 

The cabin's 143 lGgs were taken to the Nashville Centennial 
in 1894 and later moved to New York and exhibited at the Buffalo 
Exposition in 1901. 

In 1906 the logs were shipped to Louisville where they re- 
mained stored in the "Louisville Public Warehouse" until they were 
expressed to Hodgenville in 1909 and used at the laying of the corner 
stone and were then sent back to Louisville. 

At the dedication of the building in 1911 the cabin rested 
again on its original site inside the Memorial Edifice, from which 
it will probably never again be removed until by the decay and dust 
of time. 



The Memorial Building 



The cornerstone of the Lincoln Memorial building at Lincoln 
Farm was laid by President Theodore Roosevelt on February 12, 
1909, the one hundredth anniversary of Lincoln's birth. 

Instead of the Jackson Highway, which now passes the Farm, 
the road was deep red clay mud land the President rode out in a 
carriage. In the escort were twelve Confederate veterans. 

Among other speakers on that program were Augustus E. 
Wilson, Governor of Kentucky; General James Grant Wilson; Gov- 
ernor Joseph W. Folk, of Missouri; and General Luke E. Wright. 

President Roosevelt in his closing words that day sai,d: ''The 
years roll by and all of us, wherever we dwell grow to feel an equal 
pride in the valor and self devotion alike of the men who wore the 
blue and the men who wore the gray, so this whole nation will grow 
to feel a peculiar sense of pride in the man whose blood was shed 
for the union of his people and the freedom of a race; the lover of 
his country and of all mankind; the mightiest of the mighty men 
who mastered the mighty days — Abraham Lincoln". 

The Memorial Building was built by popular subscription. It 
was .dedicated in 1911, President Taft delivering the chief address 
on a platform near the flagpole. 

Later, when the Memorial Farm and buildings were turned 
over to the United States Government by the 'Lincoln Farm Associa- 
tion', President Woodrow Wilson came to the Memorial and delivered 
the acceptance speech in September, 1916. 

The attendant and guide, John Cissell, who is custodian of 
the cabin, is a grandson of Richard Creal, who lived in the double 
log house to be seen at the entrance. Mr. Cissell has never lived out 
of sight of the spot where Lincoln was born, in the cabin later 
owned by Mr. Cissell's grandfather. 



Kni; raved on front walls of Memorial Building 



DEDICATION 

HERE 

OVER THE LOG CABIN WHERE ABRAHAM 

LINCOLN WAS BORN DESTINED TO 

PRESERVE THE UNION AND FREE THE 

SLAVE 

A GRATEiFUL PEOPLE HAVE DEDICATED 

THIS MEMORIAL TO UNITY PEACE 
AND BROTHERHOOD AMONG THE STATES 



WORDS OF LINCOLN 

LET US HAVE FAITH 

THAT RIGHT MAKES MIGHT 

AND IN THAT FAITH LET US TO 

THE END DARE TO DO OUR DUTY 

Cooper Institute, N. Y., Feb. 27, 1860. 



STAND WITH ANYBODY THAT 

STANDS RIGHT 

STAND WITH HIM WHILE HE 

IS RIGHT, AND PART WITH HIM 

WHEN HE GOES WRONG 

Peoria, 111., Oct. 16, 1854. 



WITH MALICE TOWARDS NONE 
WITH CHARITY FOR ALL 



POETRY AND HISTORY 



Following- are facsimiles of engravings on interior of 
Memorial Building 



TRIBUTES 

HE WAS THE NORTH, THE SOUTH, THE EAST, THE WEST, 

THE THRALL, THE MASTER, ALL OF US IN ONE; 

THERE WAS NO SECTION THAT HE HELD THE BEST; 

HIS LOVE SHOWN AS IMPARTIAL AS THE SUN; 

AND SO REVEiNGE APPEALED TO HIM IN VAIN, 

HE SMILED AT IT AS AT A THING FORLORN, 

GENTLY PUT IT FROM HIM, ROSE AND STOOD 

A MOMENTS SPACE IN PAIN, 

REMEMBERING THE PRARIES AND THE CORN 

AND THE GLAD VOICES OF THE FIELD AND WOOD. 

MAURICE THOMPSON 

THE COLOR OF THE GROUND WAS IN HIM THE RED EARTH; 

THE SMELL AND SMACK OF ELEMENTAL THINGS; 

THE RECTITUDE AND PATIENCE OF THE CLIFF; 

THE GOOD WILL OF THE RAIN THAT LOVES ALL LEAVES; 

THE FRIENDLY WELCOME OF THE WAYSIDE WELL; 

THE COURAGE OF THE BIRD THAT DARES THE SEA; 

THE GLADNESS OF THE WIND THAT SKAKES THE CORN; 

THE MERCY OF THE SNOW THAT HIDES ALL SCARS; 

THE SECRECY OF STREAMS THAT MAKE THEIR WAY 

BENEATH THE MOUNTAINS TO THE RIFTED ROCK; 

THE UNDERLYING JUSTICE OF THE LIGHT 

THAT GIVES AS FREELY TO THE SHRINKING FLOWER 

AS TO THE GREAT OAK FLARING TO THE WIND 

TO THE GRAVE'S LOW HILL AS TO THE MATTERHORN 

THAT SHOULDERS OUT THE SKY. 

EDWIN MARKHAM. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY. 



I WAS BORN FEB. 12, 1809, IN HARDIN COUNTY, 
KENTUCKY. MY PARENTS WERE BORN IN 
VIRGINIA. MY MOTHER WHO DIED IN MY TENTH 
YEAR, WAS OF A FAMILY OF THE NAME OF HANKS. 
MY FATHER AT THE DEATH OF HIS FATHER WAS 
BUT SIX YEARS OF AGE, AND HE GREW UP, 
LITERALLY WITHOUT EDUCATION. HE REMOVED 
FROM KENTUCKY TO WHAT IS NOW SPENCER 
CCUNTY, INDIANA, IN MY EIGHTH YEAR. WE REACHED 
OUR NEW HOME ABOUT THE TIME THE STATE 
CAME INTO THE UNION. IT WAS A WILD REGION, 
WITH MANY BEARS AND OTHER WILD ANIMALS, 
STILL IN THE WOODS. THERE I GREW UP. THERE 
WERE SOME SCHOOLS, SO CALLED. 
THERE WAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO EXCITE 
AMBITION FOR EDUCATION. OF COURSE WHEN 
I CAME OF AGE I DID NOT KNOW MUCH. STILL, 
SOMEHOW, I COULD READ, WRITE, AND CIPHER 
TO THE RULE OF THR2E BUT THAT WAS ALL 
THE LITTLE ADVANCE I NOW HAVE UPON THIS 
STORE OF EDUCATION, I HAVE PICKED UP FROM 
TIME TO TIME, UNDER THE PRESSURE 
OF NECESSITY. 

A. LINCOLN. 



THOMAS LINCOLN 

January 30, 1770 January 17, 1851 

FIFTH IN DESCENT FROM SAMUEL LINCOLN, WEAVER, 
WHO LANDED AT HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, MAY 26, 
1637. ORPHANED AT SIX YEARS OF AGE BY AN INDIAN 
BULET HE GREW UP HOMELESS IN THE WILD WOODS 
OF KENTUCKY. AT TWENTY-FIVE HE WAS THE 
POSSESSOR OF THIS CABIN HOME AND ITS 
NEIGHBORING ACRES. IN 1818 HE MOVED TO INDIANA, 
THEN A TERRITORY, FIVE YEARS LATER HE FOLLOWED 
THE TIDE OF IMMIGRATION TO ILLINOIS, WHERE HE 
LIVED A PEACEFUL, INDUSTRIOUS, RESPECTED 
CITIZEN, A GENERAL, HONEST AND CONTENTED 
PIONEER. WITH COURAGE AND ENERGY HE BUILT 
WITH HIS OWN HANDS, FIVE HOMES, EACH BETTER 
THAN THE PRECEEDING ONE. HE WON AND HELD 
THE LOVE AND CONFIDENCE OF TWO NOBLE WOMEN 
AND HE WAS THE FATHER OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 
"MY FATHER INSISTED THAT NONE OF HIS CHILDREN 
SHOULD SUFFER FOR THE WANT OF EDUCATION AS HE 
HAD." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

"HE WAS A GOOD CARPENTER FOR THE TIMES. 

HE HAD THE BEST SET OF TOOLS IN WASHINGTON 

COUNTY. THE LINCOLNS HAD A COW AND A CALF, 

MILK AND BUTTER, A GOOD FEATHER-BED, FOR I HAVE 

SLEPT ON IT. THEY HAD A HOME-WOVEN 'KIVERLID,' 

BIG AND LITTLE POTS, A LOOM AND WHEEL, 

TOM LINCOLN WAS A MAN AND TOOK CARE OF HIS 

WIFE. REVEREND JESSE HEAD, THE MINISTER 

WHO MARRIED TOM LINCOLN AND NANCY HANKS, 

TALKED BOLDLY AGAINST SLAVERY AND TOM AND 

NANCY LINCOLN AND SARAH BUSH WERE JUST 

STEEPED FULL OF JESSE HEAD'S NOTIONS 

ABOUT THE WRONG OF SLAVERY AND THE RIGHTS 

OF MAN AS EXPLAINED BY THOMAS JEFFERSON AND 

THOMAS PAINE." Prof. T. C. GRAHAM, Louisville, Ky. 



NANCY HANKS LINCOLN 

February 4, 1784. October 5, 1818 

BORN IN VIRGINIA; WHEN THREE YEARS OLD 
HER PARENTS JOSEPH AND NANCY SHIPLEY 
HANKS, CROSSED THE MOUNTAINS INTO 
KENTUCKY. ORPHANED AT NINE SHE WAS ADOPTED 
AND REARED BY RICHARD AND LUCY SHIPLEY 
BERRY, AT WHOSE HOME IN BEECHLAND, WASH- 
INGTON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, SHE WAS MARRIED TO 
THOMAS LINCOLN, JUNE 17, 1806. OF THIS UNION 
WERE BORN SARAH, ABRAHAM AND THOMAS. THE 
FIRST MARRIED AARON GRIGSBY AND DIED IN 
INDIANA IN 1828. THE LAST DIED IN INFANCY. THE 
SECOND LIVED TO WRITE THE EMANCIPATION 
PROCLAMATION. THE DAYS OF THE DISTAFF, THE 
SKILLETT, THE DUTCH OVEN, THE OPEN FIREPLACE 
WITH ITS IRON CRANE ARE NO LONGER, BUT 
HOMEMAKING IS STILL THE FINEST OF THE FINE 
ARTS. NANCY HANKS WAS TOUCHED WITH THE 
DIVINE APTITUDE OF THE FIRESIDE. LOVED AND 
HONORED FOR HER WIT, GENIALITY AND INTELLIGENCE, 
SHE JUSTIFIED AN ANCESTRY REACHING BEYOND 
THE SEAS, REPRESENTED BY THE NOTABLE NAMES 
OF HANKS, SHIPLEY, BOCNE, EVANS / ND MORRIS, TO HER 
WAS ENTRUSTED THE TASK OF TRAINING A GIANT IN 
WHOSE CHILDHOOD'S MEMORIES SHE WAS HALLOWED. 
OF HER HE SAID, "MY EARLIEST RECOLLECTIONS OF MY 
MOTHER IS SITTING AT HER FEET WITH MY SISTER DRINK- 
ING IN THE TALES AND LEGENDS THAT WERE READ AND 
RELATED TO US." TO HIM ON HER DEATH BED SHE 
SAID: "I AM GOING AWAY FROM YOU ABRAHAM, AND 
I SHALL NOT RETURN, I KNOW YOU WILL BE A GOOD BOY, 
THAT YOU WILL BE KIND TO SARAH AND YOUR FATHER. 
I WANT YOU TO LIVE AS I HAVE TAUGHT YOU TO AND TO 
LOVE YOUR HEAVENLY FATHER.' "ALL THAT I AM OR 
HOPE TO BE I OWE TO MY ANGEL MOTHER." 



THIS MEMORIAL 

ERECTED 

BY POPULAR SUBSCRIPTION 

THROUGH THE 

LINCOLN FARM ASSOCIATION 
JOSEPH W. FOLK 

PRESIDENT 

ROBERT J. COLLIER 

VICE PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF 
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

CLARENCE H. MACKAY 

TREASURER 

RICHARD LLOYD JONES 

SECRETARY 

JOHN RUSSELL POPE 

ARCHITECT 

CORNERSTONE LAID BY 

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT 

FEBRUARY 12, 1909 

DEDICATED BY 
PRESIDENT TAFT 
NOVEMBER 9, 1911 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

LINCOLN FARM ASSOCIATION 



Engraved on rear wall of Memorial Building 



WILLIAM H. TAFT 
JOSEPH W. FOLK 
HORACE PORTER 
CHARLES E. HUGHES 
OSCAR S. STRAUS 
JOHN A. JOHNSON 
ALBERT SHAW 
SAMUEL L. CLEMENS 
CLARENCE H. MACKAY 
NORMAN HAPGOOD 
LYMAN J. GAGE 
SAMUEL GOMPERS 
AUGUST BELMONT 
ROBERT J. COLLIER 
AUGUSTUS E. WILSON 
HENRY WATTERSON 
JENKINS LLOYD JONES 
THOMAS HASTINGS 
IDA M. TARBELL 
CHARLES A. TOWNE 
RICHARD LLOYD JONES 
CARDINAL GIBBONS 
JOSEPH H. CHAOTE 
EDWARD M. SHEPHERD 
WILLIAM J. BRYAN 
CHARLES E. MINER 
WILLIAM T. JEROME 
AUGUSTUS ST. GAUDENS 



THE LINCOLN STATUE, HODGENVILLE, KY. 




Erected by state, federal and private subscription. It is the work of 
A. A. Weinmann, of New York, a pupil of St. Gaudens, and was pro- 
nounced by Robert T. Lincoln, who was present at the unveiling, "a 
noble statue" of his father. It was unveiled May 31, 1909, on which 
occasion the principal address was by Henry Watterson. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS URBANA 

973.7L63EL6388 C001 

LINCOLN MEMORIAL, HODGENVILLE, KENTUCKY, 




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